Aggressive Nature Increases Risk of Heart Attacks, Strokes

Aggressive Nature Increases Risk of Heart Attacks, Strokes Short temper and aggressive nature increase the risk of getting heart attacks and strokes in two hours following outburst, said researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

Dr. Murray A. Mittleman, senior study author and Associate Prof. of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said risks are comparatively higher in patients with pre-existing heart disease compared to patient without cardiovascular disease.

Researchers found five-time increase in risk of developing heart attack with three-time increase in risk of developing stroke within two hours after outbursts. Researcher Elizabeth Mostofsky said the findings could prove beneficial for people at higher risk of cardiovascular diseases.

Risks of heart attacks are one in every 10,000 people per year in those patients with low cardiovascular risk and those who get angry once in a month. This increase in risk factor is four in every 10,000 people per year in people with high cardiovascular risk.

Dr. Mariell Jessup, president of the American Heart Association and medical director of the Penn Heart and Vascular Center at the University of Pennsylvania, said increase in anger enlarges stress hormone and also affects the nervous system.

Doing exercise, eating healthy food and quitting smoking are some of the measures one should take to lessen stress and anger.

Health: 
General: 
Region: