Study: High blood sugar increases dementia risk, even in people who don’t have diabetes

Study: High blood sugar increases dementia risk, even in people who don’t have diabetesAccording to the findings of a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, risk of dementia is linked to high levels of blood sugar, and not just diabetes.

The study – led by Dr. Paul Crane, associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington – has revealed that, on the basis of a tracking of people’s blood glucose levels over time, it has been found that “every incrementally higher glucose level was associated with a higher risk of dementia in people who did not have diabetes.”

Pointing out that the risk of Alzheimer's or any other form of dementia is higher in people who are suffering from diabetes or have heightened level of blood glucose, Dr. Crane said that the findings of the new study will probably have an impact on the way people think about blood sugar and the brain.

In addition, Dr. Crane also said that the results of the study challenge the present medical thinking by clearly depicting that it is not merely high glucose levels which are a concern for dementia risk.

Noting that the study underscores a “nice, clean pattern” underscoring dementia risk, Dallas Anderson - a scientist at the National Institute on Aging – said that, in simple words, the study highlights the fact that the risk of dementia increases with an increase in blood sugar.

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