Injectable Asthma Drugs to Replace Traditional Inhalers

asthmaAsthma inhalers are bidding bye as injectable biotech asthma drugs have emerged as a much better treatment, especially for patients with severe asthma. They are effective in patients not benefitted by traditional inhalers. The injectable treatment for asthma has unleashed a race among rival pharmaceutical firms to establish a strong foothold in a new market worth a more than $7.5 billion.

Britain's GlaxoSmithKline has been the leader in asthma treatment ever since it launched its Ventolin inhaler in 1969, but Roche, AstraZeneca, Sanofi and Teva are now giving it a run for its money.

Standard therapy for asthma is not good enough to better the plight of all asthma patients, with 20% of patients still struggling to seek a treatment for their worsening condition, despite so many treatment advancements have been made in the recent decades. Inhaled steroids and long-acting beta agonists are designed to open the airways, but these treatments still do not have the efficacy to provide a much needed relief to all asthma patients.

But not anymore, novel antibody-based drugs are making their ways to shelves to get into the depth of the problem and target key inflammatory chemicals produced in the body to progress asthma. Doctors have already expressed their support for the new treatment, referring it as a major advancement in asthma treatment.

As per consultancy Decision Resources, there are about two million patients with severe asthma in leading industrialized nations.

"I'm very optimistic about the new drugs. We have participated in several trials with the new biological agents and have seen some amazing results", said Elisabeth Bel, president-elect of the European Respiratory Society and head of respiratory medicine at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam.

The new injectable medicines have reduced serious asthma attacks, known as exacerbations, by 40 to 60% in clinical trials. These attacks are life threatening and lead to a big financial burden to healthcare systems providing emergency care.

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