Judges of US Appeals Court Agrees Apple Violated Antitrust Law by Conspiring to Raise Price of e-books

Judges of US Appeals Court Agrees Apple Violated Antitrust Law by Conspiring to Raise Price of e-books On Tuesday, a three-judge panel of a federal appeals court agreed that in 2010 Apple had violated antitrust rules by scheming with publishers and raised the prices of electronic books which was dominated mainly by Amazon.com.

Judges of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan also agreed that in 2013, Judge Denise Cote of U.S. District court was accurate in ordering injunctive relief to make sure the Cupertino, a company based in California did not commit added violations of antitrust rules.

The judge ordered the company to amend contracts with the publishers to avert price fixing and also appointed a monitor for reviewing the antitrust policies of the company. Last month, the appeals court advocated appointing of a monitor. Judge Debra Ann Livingston said the according to the finding by the judges, Apple planned a conspiracy with the publishers to increase the price of electronic books and it was "amply supported and well-reasoned."  According to her the remedy was "lawful and consistent with preventing future anticompetitive harms."

Originally, Apple was sued by the U.S. Justice Department along with thirty three states and 5 publishers.  Apple agreed to pay $400 million which is to be distributed among the consumers and $50 million as fee for the attorney and payments to states in settlement of the lawsuits by the individual states. However, if it wins the company will have to pay nothing.

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