Maggot debridement treatment effective for diabetes wounds: research

Maggot debridement treatment effective for diabetes wounds: research  Maggot debridement treatment is tremendously effective for diabetes wounds, researchers from Hawaii have suggested.

Under the Maggot debridement treatment, live insects are placed into the wounds of the patients.

A team of researchers from Kaiser Hospital and the University of Hawaii claimed that they applied maggot debridement approach to treat 37 diabetic patients, all of whom had been suffering from peripheral vascular disease and refractory wounds for up to five years.

Researchers led by Dr Lawrence Eron applied 50 to 100 maggots to the wounds for two days. They repeated the act an average of five times.

Seventy-eight per cent of patents (21 patents) were found with more than 75 per cent closure of diabetes wounds.

Speaking on the effectiveness of Maggot debridement treatment for diabetes wounds, Dr Eron said, "One of the potential improvements we can make in their treatment is to use a technique, such as maggot debridement therapy, to effectively debride infected or dead tissue to allow their wounds to heal."

The findings were revealed the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents & Chemotherapy (ICAAC) this week in Chicago.

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